The Southeast: Provence Alps Côte d'Azur

The sky clears, the air dries and Provence comes into view as one drives or trains south down the Rhone Valley. Orange, Chateaneuf-du-Pape, Avignon, Carpentras, Aix-en-Provence, Les Baux de Provence, Luberon, Arles, Marseille: between the vestiges of the Roman Empire and of the Papal States, the reds and the roses, the summer festivals and the village squares, the lavender fields of Vaucluse and the marshes of the Camargue, the footsteps of Van Gogh and the cycling routes of the Tour de France, it’s no wonder you’ll want to linger. But then the Riviera -- aka Côte d'Azur -- calls (perhaps on a direct flight to Nice): Menton, Monaco, Antibes, Cannes, Saint Tropez, gastronomy in Mougins, perfume in Grasse, Carnaval, the museums, the sport, the luxury, the hyperluxury. All that and the southern French Alps bordering Italy.

Street in the Panier district of Marseille

In Search of the Sweet Life in Marseille’s Panier District

If you’ve never heard of the French TV series Plus belle la vie (Life’s so sweet), France’s longest-running TV series, then Wendy Dubreuil’s article will help you tune into some contemporary French pop culture while also offering a glimpse of the Panier district of Marseille. The Panier largely inspired the fictional Mistral district whose lives, loves, rumors, politics and crime are depicted in the series.

Lion Feuchtwanger and the Milles Internment and Deportation Camp Near Aix-en-Provence

By Wendy Dubreuil. Aix-en-Provence may call to mind fountain-side cafés, the work of Cézanne, aristocratic palaces and the scent of lavender, but just several miles from the sunny heart of town lies a cautionary tale: the Camp des Milles, the only large French interment and deportation camp from WWII that is preserved and open to the public.

Market Day in France: The Southeast, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur

From the bulls in the Camargue to the olive trees of Provence, from the vineyards of the Rhone Valley to the lemon trees of Menton and from the fig trees of Solliès to the apple orchards of Haute Durance, the agriculture of southeast France (Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur) offers a variety of stunning landscapes and notable products to travelers in search of local and regional gastronomy.

A Whiff of Napoleon in Victory and in Defeat

June 18, 2015—Two hundred years ago today Napoleon I (Bonaparte) was defeated at Waterloo. For much of the world (except perhaps for the British) Waterloo speaks far more about the fall of Napoleon and of France’s ambitions in Europe under his leadership than it does of the victory of the forces allied against him and against France.

La Ciotat: A Splash of Reality on the Riviera

Corinne LaBalme forgoes the Saint Tropez glitz-krieg and heads for the refreshingly quirky (and under-hyped) port of La Ciotat to enjoy great food, unspoiled beaches and affordable prices in one of the all-too-rare Mediterranean enclaves that's escaped paparazzi pollution.

Unexpected Provence: Meet the New Aix

The Provençal college town of Aix-en-Provence, celebrated for Cézanne, bel canto and fountain-side cafés, puts the finishing touches on a massive urban renewal project. Corinne LaBalme sets out beyond the town's tawny-tinted 17th-18th century façades to discover 21st-century Aix.

Côte d’Azur Card Opens Doors Along the Riviera

Discovering the pleasures and treasures of the Riviera has always required a series of can’t-go-wrong choices. The choices remain rich, even difficult, but the ease of acting on them has just gotten simpler thanks to a new culture and activities pass that allows visitors access to a great variety of museums, tours, events, gardens, activities and tastings, all included with the purchase of the Cote d’Azur Card.

Out-of-Seasonal Delights: Les Baux-de-Provence

Thanks to a ruined fortress, shop-filled alleys, an expansive view over the plain and an enchanting sound-and-light show in the Quarries of Lights, Les-Baux-de-Provence is an in-season crowd pleaser. Corinne LaBalme takes us off-season Oustau de Baumanière and La Cabro d’Or, sister Relais & Chateaux-member resorts with all the trimming.

France Revisited Culinary Travel Article Takes Top Honors in Awards Competition

The North American Travel Journalists Association has announced that Gary Lee Kraut, editor of France Revisited, won GOLD in the 2013 Annual NATJA Awards Competition for best article written for the internet in the Culinary Travel category. His winning article “Drome Provencale: Eat Like a Sixth Grader, Drink Like a Wine Enthusiast” was published on France Revisited. Kraut’s article “Biarritz: The Surfing Lesson” was a finalist in the Sports and Recreation category.

Private Paris & France Tours

Award-winning travel writer and editor Gary Lee Kraut is the go-to guy for individuals and agencies seeking personalized tours, events and advice in Paris and throughout France.

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Stay curious. Stay informed.
Sign up for the France Revisited Newsletter.

The France Revisited Newsletter is sent out periodically so as to keep you informed about the 4-6 new articles that we post each month along with information about festivals, events and touring opportunities.

It’s free, of course, and you can unsubscribe at any time, though we can’t imagine why anyone would want to.

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France Revisited Newsletter

Stay curious. Stay informed.
Sign up for the France Revisited Newsletter.

The France Revisited Newsletter is sent out periodically so as to keep you informed about the 4-6 new articles that we post each month along with information about festivals, events and touring opportunities.

It’s free, of course, and you can unsubscribe at any time, though we can’t imagine why anyone would want to.

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